We’re very excited to share that 20 BRAND NEW playgrounds are planned to be built on the Central Coast over the next 10 months! And, doubly exciting, one of these parks will be a new “regional playspace” – meaning it’ll be HUGE and packed with facilities and equipment that’s guaranteed to draw a crowd.  

We’ve been chatting to Central Coast Council to find out where all of these parks will be going and what facilities they’ll each have. Central Coast Council is asking for community feedback on some of these playspaces – to make your suggestions, read on and complete the Council surveys in the links provided. 

PLUS we’ve included details (and reviews) of the 18 NEW PARKS that have been completed over the past 12 months and that are open for you to visit right now!    

 Happy playing!

A NEW Regional SUPER-SIZED Playground is coming to Green Point!

We are VERY excited about this one! Expected to be the same size as the Peninsula Recreation Precinct at Umina, a new regional play area is being planned for Green Point’s Sun Valley Reserve. The playground will be located on Sun Valley Road – where the current basketball courts are – opposite Coles Green Point (see pictures of the current site below).

Sun Valley Reserve, Green Point. The site of the new regional playground. Image ©Playing in Puddles.

Classified as a ‘Regional Playspace’ suited to a wide range of ages and ability levels, this park will see a $1.8million redevelopment that boasts new play equipment, park furniture, a drinking fountain, connective pathways, landscaping and fencing, as well as an upgrade to the existing amenities building, basketball court and car park.

Sun Valley Reserve, Green Point. The site of the new regional playground. Image ©Playing in Puddles.

This new park is going to be game changing for Central Coast locals and we can’t wait to see it get underway.

The Community Consultation Survey for this play space is now closed.

Where will the 20 new central coast playgrounds be built? 

There are 20 new parks being designed, developed and built by Central Coast Council over the next 12 months. Here’s where they’ll all be located across the Coast. Council is asking for community consultation on some of these parks. Fill in Council’s surveys (links below).

1 “Regional playspace” is coming to:
Green Point, Sun Valley Park. The Community Consultation Survey is now closed. 

4 “District playspaces” are being built at:
o Empire Bay (Shelly Beach Rd).The Community Consultation Survey is now closed. 
o Copacabana (Susan Fahey Park)
o Toowoon Bay (Swadling Reserve). Have your say! Stay tuned for survey!
o Gorokan (Wallarah Point Peace Park).The Community Consultation Survey is now closed. 

15 new or renewed “Local playspaces” are being installed at:
o Avoca, Walder Cres
o Canton Beach
o Chain Valley Bay, Sunset Parade Foreshore
o Gorokan, Dalnott Reserve
o Halekulani, Arnold Close Reserve
o Lisarow, Condula Park
o Mangrove Mountain, Bloodtree Oval. The Community Consultation Survey is now closed. 
o Narara, Gavenlock Oval
o Narara, Goonak Parade
o Narara, Treeline Close
o Point Clare, Fagans Park
o Summerland Point,  Boat Harbour
o Umina, Brisbane Ave
o Umina, Lentara Ave
o Wadalba, Voyager St. Have your say! Take survey HERE (closes 10 November).
o Warnervale, Warnervale Station

Q: WHAT’S THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN LOCAL, DISTRICT AND REGIONAL PLAYSPACES?

Answer from Central Coast Council: Council has developed a hierarchy of playspace types guided by local and state guidelines for open space so that there is a fair distribution and a variety of destination areas for short and extended visits. The hierarchy consists of:

1.  Regional playspaces – These are currently the largest of Council’s suite of playspaces which attract and serve people across the whole region and outside areas. They typically have the greatest capacity and variety of equipment and aim to improve inclusion, activation, and social engagement across all ages, abilities and cultural groups. They incorporate a wide array of complimentary facilities including shelters, tables, barbecues, car parking and associated activities such as half-courts, skate areas and bike paths. Examples include Saltwater Creek Park Long Jetty, Peninsula Recreation Precinct Umina, and Canton Beach Community Park.

2.  District playspaces – are medium size playspaces which provide for the Social Plan District but may also serve the region with play equipment catering to multiple age groups. They are accessible by bicycle, car, bus and are co-located with other facilities such as parking, toilets, shared paths or sports facilities to maximize use and are fully inclusive. An example is Sohier Park, Ourimbah. 

3.  Local playspaces  These make up 80% of our playspaces located within local parks. These typically have the least play equipment. They are intended to provide for the local community within walking distance of a 500m radius. 

Other Exciting Parks Coming SOON

This is BIG news for the Coast. The NSW Government is developing a park and water playground to Gosford waterfront (see image above). This is due to commence over the coming months. Click here to read Playing in Puddles’ review outlining all details

PLUS The Peninsula Recreation Precinct at Umina is getting a $8.25 million upgrade to the area’s skate park, BMX track and adjoining recreation areas, thanks to the Federal Government. Check out Playing in Puddles’ review for all details. 

NEW Parks completed in the past 12 months!

In the last financial year, over $1.5million has been invested by Council on renewing and upgrading 18 of our favourite playgrounds. Check out some of these awesome new parks below.

Image ©Playing in Puddles.

Killarney Vale foreshore park

Address: Lucinda Ave, Killarney Vale
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing in Puddles

long jetty foreshore park

Address: Tuggerah Pd, Long Jetty.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

Jarrett Street playground

Address: Jarrett Street, North Gosford.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

Macmasters Beach playground

Address: Benavie Reserve, Macmasters Beach.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Central Coast Council

Blue Haven Park

Address: Marsden Road, Blue Haven.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

Bateau Bay Mini Park

Address: Anglers Drive, Bateau Bay.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

heazlett park, avoca

Address: Avoca Drive, Avoca.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

gosford lions park

Address: Masons Parade, Gosford
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Central Coast Council

JOSHUA PORTER RESERVE PLAY SPACE, CHAIN VALLEY BAY

Address: Joshua Porter Reserve Play Space, Lloyd Avenue, Chain Valley Bay.

Image ©Central Coast Council

NORAVILLE PARK, IRENE PARADE RESERVE

Address: Access via Ocean Parade or Irene Parade, Noraville.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

DINOSAUR FOSSIL PARK (WENDY DRIVE PARK), POINT CLARE

Address: Wendy Drive, Point Clare.
Playing in Puddles visited! Review coming soon. 

Image ©Central Coast Council

Glenning valley park

Address: Ashwood Close, Glenning Valley.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

Bronzewing Drive, Erina

Address: Bronzewing Drive, Erina.
Playing in Puddles visited! Check out our full review here.

Image ©Playing In Puddles

SHAUN BRINKLOW PARK, COPACABANA

Address: Cnr Pampas Ave & Copacabana Drive, Copacabana.
Playing in Puddles visited! Review coming soon. 

Image ©Playing In Puddles

Lara Close playground, ourimbah

Address: Lara Close, Ourimbah.
Playing in Puddles visited! Review coming soon. 

Image ©Central Coast Council

JAMES VALE RESERVE, Mannering Park

Address: James Vale Reserve, Waverley Road, Mannering Park.

Image ©Central Coast Council

canton beach park – coming soon

Address: Beach Parade, Canton Beach.
Status: Construction commenced 23 September and is expected to take 6 weeks.

Image ©Central Coast Council

HILLCREST AVENUE PARK, TACOMA

Address: Hillcrest Avenue, Tacoma.

Want to see all of Playing in Puddles' Park Reviews?

Questions with Council

At Playing in Puddles we know there are a few key features parents and carers hope to find at parks: shade, fencing, toilets, accessible equipment (and coffee) are the main items on the wish list! Why aren’t all of these things included in every new park design? We asked Council if they could let us know.  

Q: WHY DON’T ALL PLAYgrounds HAVE SHADE STRUCTURES?

Central Coast Council: Shade structures are included at all regional and district playspaces in the areas of the park that are most essential – such as toddlers’ areas. They are not generally included in local playspaces. Council uses natural shade within playspace design via existing trees or the planting of mature trees. Shade structures or tree planting are not always possible at every location due site constraint such as impacts upon surrounding properties etc. and the high incidence of vandalism and cost of maintenance of shades structures. In line with Cancer Council recommendations it is recommended to visit playspaces mornings and afternoons and not at the hottest time of the day (in the middle of the day) and to always be wear sun-safe clothing such as long sleeves and hats.

Q: WHY aren't ALL PLAYgrounds near roads and waterways fully FENCEd?

Central Coast Council: Risk assessments are undertaken during the development of concept plans for playspace sites to ensure adequate measures are put in place for the safety of the community and users of the area. Partial fencing is occasionally included for playspaces if considered too close to a hazard, such as a main road or water body at ten metres or less. However, the fence does not replace the need for parental supervision at all times, especially around all bodies of water. Regional level playspaces will incorporate a fencing if assessed as a need for a specific use.

Q: Why can't rubber softfall be used for all play spaces?

Central Coast Council: Sand, mulch, synthetic grass (with attenuation) and rubber softfall are the four identified choices for playground surfacing that meet Australian Standard requirements to minimise risk and injury. Each choice has its positive and negative attributes. Rubber softfall provides a stable and level surface ensuring the area is accessible, however it has a relatively low lifespan, high installation cost and holds heat during summer months. Mulch softfall and sand are generally less expensive than rubber but requires regular maintenance and topping up. Often these surfaces are a cooler surface than rubber softfall. Council uses both rubber and mulch softfall in most playspace areas to balance between functionality and cost effectiveness. The rubber softfall is typically used in high wear areas and the areas of the playspace that require accessible connections between the different equipment and back to other pathways around the facility.

Q: WHY ARE THERE PUBLIC TOILETS AT SOME Parks AND NOT OTHERS?

Central Coast Council: The need for and locations new parks and facilities are generally determined through the planning process and guided by existing planning policies and strategies which have considered the current and future needs of the community. Locations for new playspace facilities are determined by assessing a number of key criteria and the availability and size of land It’s certainly a key consideration for Council that we provide our region with well-maintained and activated sport, leisure and recreation facilities to support healthy lifestyles and connected communities for the benefit of all residents. The physical location of playspaces and how they are spatially distributed across the region are important in determining how well they’re used. Council aims to ensure that there is a network of well designed, inclusive, enjoyable appropriately sited playspaces that provide diversity in play experiences. The location is determined by the availability of existing quality open space to support the inclusion of a playspace facility that meets the design requirements.

Q: HOW ARE THE LOCATIONS OF NEW PLAYSPACE FACILITIES DETERMINED?

Central Coast Council: The co-location of other facilities such as pathways for accessibility and public toilets are considered when selecting locations for new playspaces. Regional playspaces are generally designed to include public amenities buildings where they don’t already exist.are important in determining how well they’re used. Council aims to ensure that there is a network of well designed, inclusive, enjoyable appropriately sited playspaces that provide diversity in play experiences. The location is determined by the availability of existing quality open space to support the inclusion of a playspace facility that meets the design requirements.

Q: What about the North?

Central Coast Council: The Northern end of the Coast has seen a number of playspaces newly built or renewed, and in the last 12 months there has been an equal amount of playspaces constructed in the north and southern areas (9 out of the 18).   

New playspaces completed during financial year 2019-20 located in the northern areas:

1.  Bateau Bay Mini Park, Anglers Drive, accessible through pathway

2.  Blue Haven, Marsden Rd

3.  Chain Valley Bay, Joshua Porter Reserve Play Space, Lloyd Ave

4.  Glenning Valley, Ashwood Close

5.  Killarney Vale Foreshore Lucinda Ave

6.  Long Jetty Foreshore, Tuggreah Pd, (end Elsiemer Rd)

7.  Mannering Park, James Vale Reserve, Waverley Rd

8.  Noraville, Irene Parade Reserve, access via Ocean Pde or Irene Parade

9.  Ourimbah, Lara Close

In this current financial year, we will continue to invest in quality, inclusive and engaging play spaces across our region (FY2019-20). 

The north will receive two district playspaces at Toowoon Bay (Swadling Reserve) and also Gorokan (Wallarah Point Peace Park), plus seven local playspaces will be constructed at Canton Beach, Chain Valley Bay, Sunset Parade Foreshore, Gorokan, Dalnott Reserve, Halekulani, Arnold Close Reserve, Mangrove Mountain, Bloodtree Oval, Summerland Point, Boat Harbour, and Warnervale, Warnervale Station.

Check out some of our favourite parks from around the world

Monstrum playground in Espergærde, Denmark. Image ©Monstrum.

Here at Playing in Puddles we’ll travel a long way to visit a fantastic park. We’ve been doing some research and have found some absolutely awesome playgrounds around the world. Add these to your bucket list.

The Pod Playground, Canberra. Image ©TLC

Wulaba Park, Waterloo. Image ©City of Sydney

Monstrum playground in China. Image ©Monstrum. 

Oatley Park playground. Image ©The Leader

Scroll through this picture above to see a heap more incredible parks from around the world.